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ACADEMIC:

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

The College of Engineering offers a five-year program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. The program is administered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Mechanical engineers are present in almost every industry. Most fundamentally, they apply the principles of two physics' fields -mechanics and heat- to the design of machines. Heat is one of the principal forms in which we use energy, so mechanical engineering is fundamental to all processes in which energy is produced and used. The field of mechanics is divided into the sub-fields of solid mechanics and fluid mechanics, and both of these subfields are basic to mechanical engineering.

A few of the myriad activities in which mechanical engineers engage are engine design, automobiles, jets, diesel locomotives, or lawn mowers; rocket propulsion; combustion research; rapid transit systems, such as the new subways; earth-moving machinery; air-conditioning systems; wind energy and solar energy devices; aerospace vehicles; turbines for electric power generation; automatic control for rolling mills; farm machinery; typewriters; computer input—output devices; prosthetic devices and artificial limbs; artificial hearts; precision measuring equipment; printing presses; food processing systems; and pumps to circulate water in a swimming pool or to drive coolant through a nuclear power plant. The list is almost endless, but wherever a machine is needed to create motion, move a load, create energy, or convert it, there you will find mechanical engineers at work.

- Excerpts from J.D. Kemper, "Introduction to the Engineering Profession", Second Edition, Saunders College Publishing, ISBN: 0-03-092858-3.


Mission of the Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Program:

Enabling the preparation and formation of mechanical engineering leaders and the world by encouraging creativity, teaching analytical ability, inculcating professional ethics and ingraining lifelong learning.

Mechanical Engineering Program Objectives:

The objectives of the program are:

  1. To provide society with mechanical engineering graduates with broad scientific and technical knowledge and skills to enable them to work professionally in areas of analysis, design and realization of mechanical and thermal systems.
  2. To provide the structured environment needed to facilitate the search and understanding of scientific knowledge while providing a flexible atmosphere which promotes creativity and innovation among students, faculty and staff in constant search for new knowledge.

Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Educational Objectives:

At the end of the program the student must:

  1. Be capable of using modern engineering tools to apply mathematics, science, and engineering fundamentals to the modeling, analysis, and solution of real-life mechanical engineering problems.

  2. Be capable of designing and conducting experiments and maintaining a critical and objective mind when interpreting data.

  3. Be able to communicate effectively in both English and Spanish.

  4. Have the skills needed to perform effectively in multidisciplinary teams.

  5. Be able to generate specifications, and subsequently design a component, system, or process to meet desired needs in both the mechanical and thermal domain.

  6. Have an understanding of the engineering canons of ethics and the contemporary issues where they apply.

  7. Be motivated to continue the quest for knowledge throughout life.


This program is fully accredited by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET).


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PROGRAM OF STUDY

CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

FIRST YEAR
First Semester
Number
Course
Credits
QUIM 3131-3133 General Chemistry I
4
*INGL 3--- First year course in English
3
*ESPA 3101 Basic course in Spanish
3
INGE 3809 Creative Design I
3
**Socio Hum. Elective
3
16


Second Semester
Number
Course
Credits
MATE 3031 Calculus I
4
QUIM 3132-3134 General Chemistry II
4
*INGL 3--- First year course in English
3
*ESPA 3102 Basic course in Spanish II
3
INME 3810 Creative Design II
2
16


SECOND YEAR
First Semester
Number
Course
Credits
MATE 3032 Calculus II
4
FIS I 3171 Physics I
4
FISI 3173 Physics Laboratory I
1
INGL 3--- Second year course in English
3
INGE 3031 Engineering Mechanics-Static
3
15


Second Semester
Number
Course
Credits
MATE 3063 Calculus III
3
FISI 3172 Physics II
4
FISI 3174 Physics Laboratory II
1
INGL 3--- Second year course in English
3
INGE 3032 Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics
3
EDFI --- Physical Education Elective
1
15


THIRD YEAR
First Semester
Number
Course
Credits
MATE 4009 Ordinary Differential Equations
3
INGE 3016 Algorithms and Computer Programming
3
INME 4001 Thermodynamics I
3
INGE 4019 Mechanics of Materials
4
**Socio Hum. Elective
3
16


Second Semester
Number
Course
Credits
INGE 4XXX Fluid Mechanics
4
INME 4005 Mechanism Design
3
INME 4002 Thermodynamics II
3
INEL 4075 Fundamentals of Electrical Eng
3
INME 4107 Science of Eng. Materials
4
17


FOURTH YEAR
First Semester
Number
Course
Credits
INME 4XXX Systems Dynamics
3
INEL 4076 Fundamentals of Electronics
3
INME 4011 Design of Machine Elements I
3
INME 4015 Heat Transfer
3
ECON 3021 Principles of Economics: Microeconomics
3
15


Second Semester
Number
Course
Credits
ININ 4007 Industrial Organization and Management
3
INME 4055 Manufacturing Processes
3
INME 4056 Manufacturing Process Lab
1
INME 4012 Design of Machine Elements II
3
ELECTIVE Free Elective
3
**Socio Hum. Elective
3
16


FIFTH YEAR
First Semester
Number
Course
Credits
INME 4031 Mechanical Engineering Lab. I
2
INME ---- Design Elective
3
INME ---- Technical or Design Elective
3
ELECTIVE Free Elective
3
ELECTIVE Free Elective
3
**Socio Hum. Elective
3
17


Second Semester
Number
Course
Credits
INME 4032 Mechanical Engineering Lab. II
2
INME 4057 Engineering Design
4
INME ---- Design Elective
3
INME ____ Technical or Design Elective
3
ELECTIVE Free Elective
3
EDFI Physical Education Elective
1
16

Total credits required for program: 159


*Refer to the Academic Regulations section for information on Advanced Placement.
**The twelve (12) credit hours of Sociohumanistic electives will be selected by the student, with the advisor's approval, from a list of recommended courses.

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DEPARTMENTAL FACULTY
JAYANTA BANERJEE, Professor, Ph.D., 1969, University of Waterloo.

PABLO CÁCERES-VALENCIA, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 1985, University of Wales.

SANDRA COUTIN, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 1996, Kansas State University.

RUBÉN DÍAZ, Assistant Professor, Ph.D., 2005, University of California, Berkeley.

DAVID B. DOONER, Professor, Ph.D., 1991, University of Florida, Gainesville.

VIJAY K. GOYAL, Associate Professor, Ph.D. 2002, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

GUSTAVO GUTIÉRREZ, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 2002, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

YI JIA, Professor, Ph.D., 1994, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China.

FREDERICK A. JUST-AGOSTO, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 1997, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

VIKRAM PANDYA, Assistant Professor, PhD, 1993, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbhai, India.

NÉSTOR L. PÉREZ-BARRIOS, Professor, Ph.D., 1988, University of Idaho.

FERNANDO E. PLA-BARBY, Professor, Ph.D., 1978, University of Texas, Austin.

FRANCISCO RODRÍGUEZ-ROBLES, Assistant Professor, Ph.D., 2003, University of Dayton.

LOURDES M. ROSARIO, Professor, Ph.D., 1988, University of Rhode Island.

ORLANDO RUIZ, Assistant Professor, Ph.D., 2000, Georgia Institute of Technology.
ALI SABZEVARI, Professor, Ph.D., 1967, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio.

DAVID SERRANO, Professor, Sc.D., 1987, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

PAUL A. SUNDARAM, Professor, Ph.D., 1988, The Ohio State University.

RICKY VALENTÍN, Assistant Professor, Ph.D., 2003, University of Maryland.

NELLORE VENKATARAMAN, Professor, Ph.D., 1970, Purdue University.

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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Undergraduate Courses

INGE/INME 3809. CREATIVE DESIGN I. Three credit hours. Two hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Introduction to the underlying principles and methodologies of engineering graphics communications, as a tool for the solution of engineering problems: Fundamentals of graphic visualization, sketching, PC-based Computer-Aided-Design (CAD), and technical presentations. An introduction to computer-aided-design software will include principles of parametric solid modes of mechanical parts and assemblies including dimensions and tolerances. Solid modeling is the tool for visualization, and analysis of engineering problems.


INME 3810. CREATIVE DESIGN II. Two credit hours. Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INME 3011 or (INGE 3809 or INME 3809.

Product dissection uses hands-on dissection exercises to develop in students the ability to understand a machine in not only its functionality but also in terms of its history, social impact, the design methodology, the marketing constraints and the customer needs. Use of proper technical vocabulary to describe mechanical and electrical components. Learn oral, written and hand sketching communication skills.


INME 4001. THERMODYNAMICS I. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture an one hour of tutorage per week. Prerequisites: QUIM 3002 and FISI 3172 and FISI 3174.

A study of the first and second laws of thermodynamics; properties, equations of state, and thermodynamic relations.


INME 4002. THERMODYNAMICS II. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture and one hour of tutorage per week. Prerequisite: INME 4001.

The application of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics to the study of power and refrigeration cycles and combustion processes. Introduction to gas dynamic: concepts, nonreactive mixtures and psychrometrics.


INME 4003. DESIGN OF THERMAL AND FLUID SYSTEMS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: INME 4001 and INME 4015.

Analysis and design of piping systems and heat exchangers. Selection of pumps and fans. Systems simulation and modeling.


INME 4005. MECHANISM DESIGN. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: INGE 3032 and INGE 3016 and INME 3810.

Fundamental concepts of mechanism design including synthesis, and kinematics and kinetic analysis. Study of linkages, cams, gears, gear trains, and flexible connectors mechanisms, among others.


INME 4006. DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY. Three credit hours. Two hours of lecture and one two-hour computation or demonstration period per week. Prerequisites: MATE 4009 and INME 4005.

A study of static and inertia forces in machinery; free and forced vibration isolation; balancing of rotors; critical speed of shafts.


INME 4007. METALLURGY FOR ENGINEERS. Three credit hours. Two hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: INME 4001 and INGE 4001.

A study of the relationship of the mechanical properties of metals to their micro and macro structure, with emphasis on the application of metals in the fields of engineering.


INME 4008. AERODYNAMICS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: MATE 4009, INME 4001 and INGE 4015.

The basic principles of aerodynamics, with particular reference to airfoils, and the theory of lift and drag; airplane performance problems from the standpoint of power required, rate of climb, range and economy at various altitudes.


INME 4009. AUTOMATIC CONTROLS. Three credit hours. Two hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: MATE 4009, INGE 3032, INEL 4075 and (INEL 3105 or INEL 4005).

Utilization, calibration and sensitivity of instruments for measuring temperature, pressure, volume, strain, and fluid flow. Analysis of electrical, electronic, hydraulic, mechanical and pneumatical servomechanisms. Control systems and their characteristics, such as: response, sensitivity and stability.


INME 4011. DESIGN OF MACHINE ELEMENTS I. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: INME 4005.

Application of the fundamentals of statics dynamics, strength materials science to the design of machine members and other mechanical elements.

INME 4012. DESIGN OF MACHINE ELEMENTS II. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INME 4011. Corequisite: INME 4007.

Analysis and design of specific machine components including screws, nuts, springs, gears, bearings, shafts, brakes, clutches, and couplings.


INME 4015. HEAT TRANSFER. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: INGE 4015, MATE 4009, INGE 3016 and INME 4001 or INME 4045.

Fundamentals of steady and unsteady conduction, forced and natural convection and radiation. Introduction to heat exchangers.


INME 4018. ENERGY CONVERSION. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: INME 4015, INEL 4076 and INME 4002.

A study of the different methods of energy conversion. The course will cover the basic theoretical concepts, and will include discussions on conventional and modern devices for energy conversion, such as steam generators, internal combustion engines, turbines, thermoionic and thermoelectric systems, fuel cells, thermonuclear plants, and lasers.


INME 4019. ENERGY AUDITING AND MANAGEMENT. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INME 4001 or INQU 4011.

Fundamental concepts of energy engineering; principles and methods related to the use, conservation, auditing and management of energy sources.


INME 4027. POWER PLANT ENGINEERING. Three credit hours. Two hours of lecture and three of computation per week. Prerequisites: INME 4002 and INME 4015.

The application of fundamental concepts of thermal sciences and economics to the analysis of power generating stations; emphasis on steam and gas systems.


INME 4028. FLUID MACHINERY. Three credit hours. Two hours of lecture and one two-hour computation period per week. Prerequisites: INGE 4015 and INME 4002.

A presentation of the engineering applications of fluid mechanics in the study and design of fluid machinery, such as axial and centrifugal fans, blowers and compressors, pumps, fluid couplings, torque converters and turbines.


INME 4031. MACHINE SCIENCE LABORATORY. Two credit hours. One two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: INME 4015, INEL 4076 and INME 4002.

Experiments and projects in the areas of machine science: synthesis and analysis of kinematics chains, shafts, gears, torque loading in bolt assemblies, dynamic and static loading, fatigue and other failure mechanisms. Introduction to applied statistics and design of experiments, use of transducers, sensors and computer-based data acquisition systems for collecting and evaluating data related to position, velocity, acceleration, force, torque, mechanical vibrations, and sound level.


INME 4032. THERMAL SCIENCE LABORATORY. Two credit hours. One two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: INME 4031.

Experiments and projects in the areas of thermal science and fluid mechanics: generation of power, combustion, compressors, cooling towers, and others. Introduction to applied statistics and design of experiments focusing on thermal processes. Use of sensors and state-of-the-art computerized data acquisition systems to record temperature, heat flow, specific humidity, flow rate.


INME 4035. REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: INME 4015 and INME 4002.

A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of air conditioning; psychometric calculations; comfort, health and industrial processes requirements; heating and cooling loads; air conditioning equipment and its selection.


INME 4037. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INME 4015.

A presentation and study of modern spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines, including types and characteristics; operating power cycles; combustion phenomena; engine performance; heat losses and efficiencies.


INME 4039. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE. Three credit hours. Thirty five hours per week for seven (7) or more weeks during the Summer or its equivalent during the semester. Prerequisite: authorization of the Director of the Department.

A course organized in cooperation with private industry or government to provide the student with practical experience in mechanical engineering. The work performed by the student will be jointly supervised by the Academic Department and an appropriate official from the cooperating organization. An oral and written report will be required from the student upon completion of the project.


INME 4045. GENERAL THERMODYNAMICS FOR ENGINEERS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: QUIM 3002 and either (FISI 3172 or FISI 3162 or FISI 3012).

Fundamental laws and principles of thermodynamics and their application in engineering. Thermodynamic and energetic concepts, properties of pure substances, heat transfer, heat engines.


INME 4055. MANUFACTURING PROCESSES. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INGE 4001 or INME 4107

Different manufacturing processes and machine tools; influence of the method of fabrication upon the properties of materials; computer and numerical control of machine-tools; use of plastics.


INME 4056. MANUFACTURING PROCESSES LABORATORY. One credit hour. One three-hour laboratory per week. Co-requisite: INME 4055.

Demonstrations and operation of machine-tools in modern manufacturing.


INME 4057. ENGINEERING DESIGN. Four credit hours. Two hours of lecture and two three-hour periods of computation per week. Prerequisites: INME 4002, INME 4007, INME 4012, and INME 4015.

Formulation, design and analysis of engineering projects; creative aspects of design; design methodology, safety, liability and patents. Technical presentations, both oral and written.


INME 4058. COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: INME 4012 and INGE 3017.

Use of software and interactive terminals in the design of machine elements, energy conversion, transfer processes and control systems.


INME 4065. PRODUCT DESIGN. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: authorization of the Director of the Department.

Factors affecting a product design: composition, cost, reliability, quality, maintainability, manufacturability, and aesthetics. These factors are applied in a project design.


INME 4107. MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Four credit hours. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: INME 4001 and FISI 3171.

A study of the relationship of the mechanical properties of materials to their micro and macro structure, with emphasis on the application of materials in the fields on Engineering.


INME 4995. ENGINEERING PRACTICE FOR COOP STUDENTS. Zero to six credit hours. A minimum of two work periods are required for the accreditation of the course, one of which must be a semester. Prerequisite: authorization of the Director of the Department.

Practical experience in mechanical engineering in cooperation with private industry or government to be jointly supervised by the academic department, the Co-op Program Coordinator, and an official from the cooperating organization. A written report will be required upon completion of each period of work.


INME 4998. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. One to six credit hours. Three to twenty-four hours of research per week. Pre-requisite: Fourth or fifth year student and authorization of the Director of the Department.

Participation, under the supervision of a faculty member acting as an investigator, in a research project.


Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses

INME 5005. LUBRICATION. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: authorization of the Director of the Department.

Fundamental principles and concepts of lubrication theory; hydrostatic and hydrodynamic lubrication; examples of journal and thrust bearing design, using both the hydrostatic and hydrodynamic principles; considerations in boundary lubrication.


INME 5007. SOLAR ENERGY APPLICATIONS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INME 4015 or INQU 4001 or authorization of the Director of the Department.

Fundamentals of solar radiation, its measurement, and methods of estimation. Selected topics on heat transfer relevant to systems design applications of solar energy such as flat plate and focusing collectors, energy storage systems, heating and cooling systems, power systems, and distillation processes.


INME 5008. CORROSION. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INME 4007 or INME 4107.

Electrochemical principles and corrosion mechanisms; protection and prevention of corrosion in metals; the effects of temperature, environment, and metallurgical factors.


INME 5015. SELECTED TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. One to six credit hours. One to six hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: authorization of the Director of the Department.

A study of certain selected topics in mechanical engineering not covered by other existing courses.


INME 5018. MATERIALS FAILURE ANALYSIS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: INME 4012 and INME 4007.

Materials science concepts used to identify, correct and prevent failures due to the improper use of materials or to problems in manufacturing processes. In depth study of failure mechanisms such as fatigue, wear, creep, and corrosion.


INME 5025. METALS FATIGUE. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INME 4007 or INME 4107.

Nature of metal fatigue; modern approaches to design of mechanical components for repeated loadings; importance of residual stresses and stress concentrations; analysis of cumulative damage and life prediction; cycle counting and sequence of events.


INME 5711. AEROSPACE STRUCTURAL DESIGN I. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INME 4011 or authorization of the Director of the Department.

Study and application of the principles of machine design and steady load failure theory toaerospace structures. Design of thin-walled fatigue resistant aerospace structures; analysis of the state of stress and strain in stiffened Shell beams including thermal effects; deformation analysis by the Principle of Virtual Work and Complementary Principle of Virtual Work; and structural dynamics analysis.


INME 5712. AEROSPACE STRUCTURAL DESIGN II. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INME 5711 or authorization of the Director of the Department.

Study of aspects of structural analysis pertinent to the design of flight vehicles. Wing design based on aeroelasticity (wing flutter), wing divergence, vibrational analysis, environmental loads, aerospace materials, bucking of thin-walled compression members. Finite element analysis of elastic structures using the Principle of Virtual Work.


INME 5995. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. One to six credit hours. One to six hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: authorization of the Director of the Department.

Researches and special problems in Mechanical Engineering and related fields.


INME 5997. SELECTED TOPICS II. One to six credit hours. One to six hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: authorization of the Director of the Department.

Study of selected topics in mechanical engineering or related fields.


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