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ACADEMIC:

DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL ENGINEERING

The General Engineering Department includes professors with an interdisciplinary background from different fields of engineering. It is mainly responsible for most of the academic offerings in engineering during the first three years of study. Since all engineering disciplines rest on a common foundation, the administration and teaching of the basic and common courses can be handled most efficiently outside of the specialized departments.

The common foundation, which can be described as the study of applied physical science, or Engineering Science, is composed of courses such as: Engineering Graphics, Computer Programming, Numerical Methods, Computer Graphics, Applied Mechanics, Mechanics of Materials, Materials Science, and Fluid Mechanics. A broad, yet in-depth, knowledge of all of these areas is indispensable in every field of engineering, not only for further studies, but also for the successful practice of the engineering profession.

The General Engineering Department also offers interdisciplinary elective courses which are within the competence of its faculty. General Engineering faculty are also involved in research in Engineering, Science, and Engineering Education. Due to their background, projects with an interdisciplinary nature are very frequently the target of our faculty.

DEPARTMENTAL FACULTY
EDUARDO AÑESES, Assistant Professor, M.Arch., 1996, Universidad Autónoma de Guadalajara.

MARCO A. AROCHA, Professor, Ph.D., 1995, University of California.

JOSE R. ARROYO-CARABALLO, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 1999, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus.

IVAN BAIGES, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 1995, University of Florida.

PABLO CACERES, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 1984, University College Cardiff, Wales, UK.

BARBARA CALCAGNO-PIZZARELLI, Associate Professor, M.S.Ch.E., 1981, University of Pennsylvania.

ANDRES CALDERON-COLON, Professor, Ph.D., 1976, University of Illinois.

CARMEN CASTAÑEYRA, Assistant Professor, M.S.I.E., 1990, University of Puerto Rico.

JOSE E. CRESPO-BADILLO, Instructor, M. Arch, 1997, State University of New York at Buffalo.

MIGUEL A. CRUZ-AROCHO, Professor, M.S Env. E., 1977, Georgia Institute of Technology.

MEGH GOYAL-AGGARWAL, Professor, Ph.D., 1979, Ohio State University.

ENRIQUE A. MAESTRE-KOPPISCH, Professor, M.S.M.E., 1974, University of Puerto Rico.

JAIME B. RAMIREZ-VICK, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 1997, Arizona State University

MARIO RIVERA-BORRERO, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 1997, Virginia Polytechnic Institute.

JOSEPH ROBINSON, Assistant Professor, MA, 1984, Counseling Psychology, Seton Hall University.

WILMA SANTIAGO, Assistant Professor, M. Arch., 1992, University of Wisconsin.

MAREK RYSZ, Professor, Ph.D., 1981, Technical University of Cracow (Poland).

JEANNETTE SANTOS-CORDERO, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 1995, Louisiana State University.

BASIR SHAFIQ, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 1996, University of Illinois.

ANAND D. SHARMA, Professor, Ph.D., 1980, Texas A&M University.

ARSALAN SHOKOOH, Professor, Ph.D., 1977, Illinois Institute of Technology.

WALTER SILVA-ARAYA, Professor, Ph.D., 1993, Washington State University.

OSCAR M. SUAREZ, Associate Professor, Ph.D., 2000, University of Wisconsin-Madison

FREYA TOLEDO-FERIA, Associate Professor, M.S.I.E., 1985, University of Massachusetts.

OSWALD N.C. UWAKWEH, Associate Professor, 1990, Universite De Nancy1, France.


COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

GENERAL ENGINEERING

INGE 3007. HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week.

Introduction to the history of technology and engineering, from the Stone Age to the Industrial Revolution, emphasizing the relationships between technology, energy, and society. Focuses on Western history and cultures; with examples from Puerto Rico. Includes field trips and student presentations.


INGE 3011. ENGINEERING GRAPHICS I. Two credit hours. One hour of lecture and two one-and-one-half-hour laboratories per week.

Principles of graphic language: Fundamentals of delineation, analysis and solution of space problems, symbols and standards as applied in engineering. Freehand drawing as a tool for visualization. Principles of orthographic projection, sections, auxiliary views and conventional practices. Pictorial drawings: axonometric, oblique and perspective. Introduction to descriptive geometry. Hand and computer-aided drawing.


INGE 3012. ENGINEERING GRAPHICS II. Two credit hours. Two two-hours of lecture-drawing periods per week. Prerequisite: INGE 3011.

Underlying principles of the graphic language: fundamentals of delineation, analysis and solution of space problems, symbols and standards as applied to engineering, spatial geometry: distances between planes and lines, angles between lines and planes, rotation problems. Introduction to graphical mathematics and nomography.


INGE 3016. ALGORITHMS AND COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: MATE 3031 or MATE 3144 or MATE 3183.

Development of algorithms and their implementation in a structured high level language. Programming techniques applied to the solution of engineering and mathematical problems.


INGE 3017. COMPUTED AIDED GRAPHICS. Two credit hours. Two two-hour of lecture- laboratory per week.

Fundamentals of computer aided graphics in engineering. Description of the equipment, use of commercial solid modeling programs, modeling of geometric figures and documentation.


INGE 3025. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS. Three credit hours. Two hours of lecture and two hours of computation per week. Prerequisite: MATE 3031 or MATE 3144 or MATE 3183.

Fundamental principles of programming and use of computers with special emphasis on digital computers. Application to engineering problems.


INGE 3031. ENGINEERING MECHANICS STATICS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: MATE 3031 or MATE 3144 or MATE 3183.

Analysis of force systems; the laws of equilibrium; analysis of simple structures; distributed loads; friction; centroids and moments of inertia.


INGE 3032. ENGINEERING MECHANICS DYNAMICS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: INGE 3031 and (FISI 3161 or FISI 3171).

Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies; relations among force, mass and acceleration; kinetics of particles and rigid bodies; work and energy; impulse and momentum.


INGE 3035. ENGINEERING MECHANICS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: MATE 3031 or MATE 3144 or MATE 3183. Prerequisite: FISI 3161 or FISI 3171.

Analysis of force systems; the laws of equilibrium; friction; centroids and moments of inertia. Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies.


INGE 3045. MATERIALS SCIENCE FOR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: QUIM 3002. Co-requisite: FISI 3162 or FISI 3172.

Principles that determine the properties of conductors, semiconductors, and insulators. Electromechanical properties; diffusion, electrical conduction, thermal conduction; magnetic and optical properties.


INGE 4001. ENGINEERING MATERIALS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: (QUIM 3002 or QUIM 3042) and (FISI 3161 or FISI 3171).

A study of the basic principles that govern the properties and behavior of engineering materials; atomic structures, interatomic forces, amorphous and crystalline structures; phase transformations; mechanical properties; the study of the capabilities and limitations of different materials; metals, polymers, ceramics and composites; introduction to corrosion.


INGE 4011. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS I. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INGE 3031 and (MATE 3032 or MATE 3184).

Stresses and strains due to axial, torsional, and bending loads; shear and moment diagrams.


INGE 4012. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS II. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: INGE 4011 and (MATE 3063 or MATE 3185).

Analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate beams; stresses due to combined loads; stress and strain transformation; column theory.


INGE 4015. FLUID MECHANICS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: INGE 3032 and (MATE 3063 or MATE 3185).

Elements of mechanics of fluids and fluid statics. Development of the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics and its applications. Introduction to dimensional analysis and similitude. Motion of ideal and real fluids including internal and external viscous flows. Introduction to the use of hydraulic machinery.


INGE 4016. FLUID MECHANICS LABORATORY. One credit hour. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Co-requisite: INGE 4015.

Laboratory work supplementing classroom instruction in mechanics of fluid phenomena, measuring devices and techniques, and the testing of fluid machinery.


INGE 4035. NUMERICAL METHODS APPLIED TO ENGINEERING. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: (MATE 3063 or MATE 3185) and INGE 3016.

Numerical procedures for digital computer simulation of engineering problems. The course includes numerical methods for finding roots of equations commonly encountered in engineering problems, curve fitting and modeling of experimental data, quadrature and numerical differentiation. Systems of linear and non-linear equations arising from engineering applications, solution of initial value problems applied to the fundamental laws of mechanics.


INGE 4998. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. One to six credit hours. Three to twenty-four hours of laboratory per week. Pre-requisite: Fourth or fifth year student and authorization of the Director of the Department.

Participation, under the supervision of a faculty member acting as an investigator, in a research project.


Advanced Undergraduate Courses

INGE 5015. THEORY AND MANAGEMENT OF SYSTEMS. Three credit hours. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: third year standing or higher.

Introduction to the systems approach and to systems analysis. Analytical methods applicable to interactive contexts, such as economic and ecological systems and to organizations. Topics include: Problem formulation, information management, evaluation and selection of alternatives, implementation and monitoring of solutions.


INGE 5996. SPECIAL TOPICS. One to six credit hours. One to six hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Authorization of the Director of the Department.

Study of selected topics in general engineering. The selection and scope of the topics shall be in accordance with the interests and needs of the students.


INGE 5997. SPECIAL TOPICS. One to six credit hours. One to six hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Consent of the Director of the Department.

Study of selected topics in General Engineering. The selection and scope of the topics shall be in accordance with the interests and needs of the students.


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