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Agenda universitaria del Recinto Universitario de Mayagüez

31 de Enero de 2013 Eventos en tu universidad

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Arts Meets Science
31/ Enero/ 2013 10:30 am - 8:00 pm
Arts Meets Science

The National Science Foundation presents:
Learn how a music video artist used sophisticated technology that led to the invention of new optics for science.
The Rolling Stones in 3-D
Jimi Hendrix Especrográfico
The art and physics of holography are shown and explained.

Segunda Conferencia:
Fecha: jueves, 31 de enero de 2013
Hora: 10:30 AM
Lugar: Salón de Conferencias Eugene Francis (F-229), Edificio de Física
Lecture in English. Refreshments are served.

ABSTRACT
An artist looks inward and makes an outward expression. A scientist looks outward and puts reason to work in thought. Are these two sides of the same coin? This question is explored by a visiting artist/scientist.

The first lecture of Art meets Science includes art inspired by astronomy. Space and time are vehicles for expression as well as dimensions of the universe. "Two Thousand Light Years from Home," a 3D music video, combines a stage performance with astronomical imagery. "Voyage" was inspired by the search for exoplanets, perhaps those with life. These art works were created using computers much as scientists use their instruments to explore nature.

The second lecture of Art meets Science, describes a new medium - holography - which scientists created for artists. Unlike the stereoscopic 3D music videos in the first lecture, holograms do not require special 3D glasses. A hologram is the record of light waves rather than light intensities. The process is explained, and physics students are invited to continue further study in a workshop the following week.

Tom DeWitt and Thomas D. Ditto are two sides of the same person. DeWitt's music videos such as "Little Wing" use rainbow color schemes. They look like spectroscopy. Ditto looked at the scientific uses of spectra and created new types of microscope and telescope. One application for his spectrometers is a 3D input device for artists which he calls the 3D Ring. You can learn more about the technology and the person behind them at his company's web site: www.3dewitt.com.